Questões

Total de Questões Encontradas: 60

Texto Associado Texto Associado
Atenção: Considere o texto a seguir para responder as questões de números 56 a 60.
                     December 12, 2012
                     If It’s for Sale, His Lines Sort It
                     By MARGALIT FOX
    It was born on a beach six decades ago, the product of a pressing need, an intellectual spark and the sweep of a young man’s fingers through the sand.
    The result adorns almost every product of contemporary life, including groceries, wayward luggage and, if you are a traditionalist, the newspaper you are holding.
    The man on the beach that day was a mechanical-engineer-in-training named N. Joseph Woodland. With that transformative stroke of his fingers − yielding a set of literal lines in the sand − Mr. Woodland, who died on Sunday at 91, conceived the modern bar
code.
    Mr. Woodland was a graduate student when he and a classmate, Bernard Silver, created a technology, based on a printed series of wide and narrow striations, that encoded consumer-product information for optical scanning.
    Their idea, developed in the late 1940s and patented 60 years ago this fall, turned out to be ahead of its time, and the two men together made only $15,000 from it, when they sold their patent to Philco. But the curious round symbol they devised would ultimately give rise to the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the staggeringly prevalent rectangular bar code (it graces tens of millions of different items) is officially known.
Imagem Associada da Questão
    Here is part of the story behind the invention:
    To represent information visually, he realized, he would need a code. The only code he knew was the one he had learned in the Boy Scouts.
    What would happen, Mr. Woodland wondered one day, if Morse code, with its elegant simplicity and limitless combinatorial potential, were adapted graphically? He began trailing his fingers idly through the sand.
    “What I’m going to tell you sounds like a fairy tale,” Mr. Woodland told Smithsonian magazine in 1999. “I poked my four fingers into the sand and for whatever reason − I didn’t know − I pulled my hand toward me and drew four lines. I said: ‘Golly! Now I have four lines, and they could be wide lines and narrow lines instead of dots and dashes.’ ”
    That consequential pass was merely the beginning. “Only seconds later,” Mr. Woodland continued, “I took my four fingers − they were still in the sand − and I swept them around into a full circle.”
    Mr. Woodland favored the circular pattern for its omnidirectionality: a checkout clerk, he reasoned, could scan a product without regard for its orientation.
    But that method − a variegated bull’s-eye of wide and narrow bands −, which depended on an immense scanner equipped with a 500-watt light, was expensive and unwieldy, and it languished for years.
    The two men eventually sold their patent to Philco for $15,000 − all they ever made from their invention.
    By the time the patent expired at the end of the 1960s, Mr. Woodland was on the staff of I.B.M., where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1987.
    Over time, laser scanning technology and the advent of the microprocessor made the bar code viable. In the early 1970s, an I.B.M. colleague, George J. Laurer, designed the familiar black-and-white rectangle, based on the Woodland-Silver model and drawing on Mr. Woodland’s considerable input.
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/business/n-joseph-woodland-inventor-of-the-bar-code-dies-at-91.html?nl=todaysheadlines
&emc=edit_th_20121214&_r=0)
De acordo com o texto,
A
Woodland trabalhava na I.B.M. quando criou sua invenção.
B
Woodland e Silver lucraram US$15.000 cada um com sua invenção.
C
o código de barras atual tem o mesmo formato da criação de Woodland e Silver.
D
George J. Laurer patenteou um novo código de barras em 1970.
E
Woodland se inspirou no código Morse para criar seu método.
Texto Associado Texto Associado
Atenção: Considere o texto a seguir para responder as questões de números 56 a 60.
                     December 12, 2012
                     If It’s for Sale, His Lines Sort It
                     By MARGALIT FOX
    It was born on a beach six decades ago, the product of a pressing need, an intellectual spark and the sweep of a young man’s fingers through the sand.
    The result adorns almost every product of contemporary life, including groceries, wayward luggage and, if you are a traditionalist, the newspaper you are holding.
    The man on the beach that day was a mechanical-engineer-in-training named N. Joseph Woodland. With that transformative stroke of his fingers − yielding a set of literal lines in the sand − Mr. Woodland, who died on Sunday at 91, conceived the modern bar
code.
    Mr. Woodland was a graduate student when he and a classmate, Bernard Silver, created a technology, based on a printed series of wide and narrow striations, that encoded consumer-product information for optical scanning.
    Their idea, developed in the late 1940s and patented 60 years ago this fall, turned out to be ahead of its time, and the two men together made only $15,000 from it, when they sold their patent to Philco. But the curious round symbol they devised would ultimately give rise to the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the staggeringly prevalent rectangular bar code (it graces tens of millions of different items) is officially known.
Imagem Associada da Questão
    Here is part of the story behind the invention:
    To represent information visually, he realized, he would need a code. The only code he knew was the one he had learned in the Boy Scouts.
    What would happen, Mr. Woodland wondered one day, if Morse code, with its elegant simplicity and limitless combinatorial potential, were adapted graphically? He began trailing his fingers idly through the sand.
    “What I’m going to tell you sounds like a fairy tale,” Mr. Woodland told Smithsonian magazine in 1999. “I poked my four fingers into the sand and for whatever reason − I didn’t know − I pulled my hand toward me and drew four lines. I said: ‘Golly! Now I have four lines, and they could be wide lines and narrow lines instead of dots and dashes.’ ”
    That consequential pass was merely the beginning. “Only seconds later,” Mr. Woodland continued, “I took my four fingers − they were still in the sand − and I swept them around into a full circle.”
    Mr. Woodland favored the circular pattern for its omnidirectionality: a checkout clerk, he reasoned, could scan a product without regard for its orientation.
    But that method − a variegated bull’s-eye of wide and narrow bands −, which depended on an immense scanner equipped with a 500-watt light, was expensive and unwieldy, and it languished for years.
    The two men eventually sold their patent to Philco for $15,000 − all they ever made from their invention.
    By the time the patent expired at the end of the 1960s, Mr. Woodland was on the staff of I.B.M., where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1987.
    Over time, laser scanning technology and the advent of the microprocessor made the bar code viable. In the early 1970s, an I.B.M. colleague, George J. Laurer, designed the familiar black-and-white rectangle, based on the Woodland-Silver model and drawing on Mr. Woodland’s considerable input.
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/business/n-joseph-woodland-inventor-of-the-bar-code-dies-at-91.html?nl=todaysheadlines
&emc=edit_th_20121214&_r=0)
Dentro do contexto, a tradução correta para o significado de “it languished for years” é
A
não saiu do papel por anos.
B
foi aprimorado ao longo dos anos.
C
passou por revisões durante anos.
D
foi resgatado há alguns anos.
E
foi superado após alguns anos.
Texto Associado Texto Associado
Atenção: Considere o texto a seguir para responder as questões de números 56 a 60.
                     December 12, 2012
                     If It’s for Sale, His Lines Sort It
                     By MARGALIT FOX
    It was born on a beach six decades ago, the product of a pressing need, an intellectual spark and the sweep of a young man’s fingers through the sand.
    The result adorns almost every product of contemporary life, including groceries, wayward luggage and, if you are a traditionalist, the newspaper you are holding.
    The man on the beach that day was a mechanical-engineer-in-training named N. Joseph Woodland. With that transformative stroke of his fingers − yielding a set of literal lines in the sand − Mr. Woodland, who died on Sunday at 91, conceived the modern bar
code.
    Mr. Woodland was a graduate student when he and a classmate, Bernard Silver, created a technology, based on a printed series of wide and narrow striations, that encoded consumer-product information for optical scanning.
    Their idea, developed in the late 1940s and patented 60 years ago this fall, turned out to be ahead of its time, and the two men together made only $15,000 from it, when they sold their patent to Philco. But the curious round symbol they devised would ultimately give rise to the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the staggeringly prevalent rectangular bar code (it graces tens of millions of different items) is officially known.
Imagem Associada da Questão
    Here is part of the story behind the invention:
    To represent information visually, he realized, he would need a code. The only code he knew was the one he had learned in the Boy Scouts.
    What would happen, Mr. Woodland wondered one day, if Morse code, with its elegant simplicity and limitless combinatorial potential, were adapted graphically? He began trailing his fingers idly through the sand.
    “What I’m going to tell you sounds like a fairy tale,” Mr. Woodland told Smithsonian magazine in 1999. “I poked my four fingers into the sand and for whatever reason − I didn’t know − I pulled my hand toward me and drew four lines. I said: ‘Golly! Now I have four lines, and they could be wide lines and narrow lines instead of dots and dashes.’ ”
    That consequential pass was merely the beginning. “Only seconds later,” Mr. Woodland continued, “I took my four fingers − they were still in the sand − and I swept them around into a full circle.”
    Mr. Woodland favored the circular pattern for its omnidirectionality: a checkout clerk, he reasoned, could scan a product without regard for its orientation.
    But that method − a variegated bull’s-eye of wide and narrow bands −, which depended on an immense scanner equipped with a 500-watt light, was expensive and unwieldy, and it languished for years.
    The two men eventually sold their patent to Philco for $15,000 − all they ever made from their invention.
    By the time the patent expired at the end of the 1960s, Mr. Woodland was on the staff of I.B.M., where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1987.
    Over time, laser scanning technology and the advent of the microprocessor made the bar code viable. In the early 1970s, an I.B.M. colleague, George J. Laurer, designed the familiar black-and-white rectangle, based on the Woodland-Silver model and drawing on Mr. Woodland’s considerable input.
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/business/n-joseph-woodland-inventor-of-the-bar-code-dies-at-91.html?nl=todaysheadlines
&emc=edit_th_20121214&_r=0)
Infere-se do texto que
A
o formato digital do jornal atrai os tradicionalistas.
B
pessoas conservadoras lêem o jornal em formato impresso.
C
cada vez mais pessoas estão voltando a ler o jornal impresso.
D
um dos motivos para não se ler jornal no formato impresso é o fato de sujar as mãos.
E
apesar da comodidade de se ler as notícias em formato digital, o jornal impresso ainda conta com um público maior.
Texto Associado Texto Associado
Atenção: Considere o texto a seguir para responder as questões de números 56 a 60.
                     December 12, 2012
                     If It’s for Sale, His Lines Sort It
                     By MARGALIT FOX
    It was born on a beach six decades ago, the product of a pressing need, an intellectual spark and the sweep of a young man’s fingers through the sand.
    The result adorns almost every product of contemporary life, including groceries, wayward luggage and, if you are a traditionalist, the newspaper you are holding.
    The man on the beach that day was a mechanical-engineer-in-training named N. Joseph Woodland. With that transformative stroke of his fingers − yielding a set of literal lines in the sand − Mr. Woodland, who died on Sunday at 91, conceived the modern bar
code.
    Mr. Woodland was a graduate student when he and a classmate, Bernard Silver, created a technology, based on a printed series of wide and narrow striations, that encoded consumer-product information for optical scanning.
    Their idea, developed in the late 1940s and patented 60 years ago this fall, turned out to be ahead of its time, and the two men together made only $15,000 from it, when they sold their patent to Philco. But the curious round symbol they devised would ultimately give rise to the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the staggeringly prevalent rectangular bar code (it graces tens of millions of different items) is officially known.
Imagem Associada da Questão
    Here is part of the story behind the invention:
    To represent information visually, he realized, he would need a code. The only code he knew was the one he had learned in the Boy Scouts.
    What would happen, Mr. Woodland wondered one day, if Morse code, with its elegant simplicity and limitless combinatorial potential, were adapted graphically? He began trailing his fingers idly through the sand.
    “What I’m going to tell you sounds like a fairy tale,” Mr. Woodland told Smithsonian magazine in 1999. “I poked my four fingers into the sand and for whatever reason − I didn’t know − I pulled my hand toward me and drew four lines. I said: ‘Golly! Now I have four lines, and they could be wide lines and narrow lines instead of dots and dashes.’ ”
    That consequential pass was merely the beginning. “Only seconds later,” Mr. Woodland continued, “I took my four fingers − they were still in the sand − and I swept them around into a full circle.”
    Mr. Woodland favored the circular pattern for its omnidirectionality: a checkout clerk, he reasoned, could scan a product without regard for its orientation.
    But that method − a variegated bull’s-eye of wide and narrow bands −, which depended on an immense scanner equipped with a 500-watt light, was expensive and unwieldy, and it languished for years.
    The two men eventually sold their patent to Philco for $15,000 − all they ever made from their invention.
    By the time the patent expired at the end of the 1960s, Mr. Woodland was on the staff of I.B.M., where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1987.
    Over time, laser scanning technology and the advent of the microprocessor made the bar code viable. In the early 1970s, an I.B.M. colleague, George J. Laurer, designed the familiar black-and-white rectangle, based on the Woodland-Silver model and drawing on Mr. Woodland’s considerable input.
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/business/n-joseph-woodland-inventor-of-the-bar-code-dies-at-91.html?nl=todaysheadlines
&emc=edit_th_20121214&_r=0)
A ideia de Woodland e Silver foi patenteada em
A
1960.
B
1940.
C
1952.
D
2000.
E
2012.
Texto Associado Texto Associado
Atenção: Considere o texto a seguir para responder as questões de números 56 a 60.
                     December 12, 2012
                     If It’s for Sale, His Lines Sort It
                     By MARGALIT FOX
    It was born on a beach six decades ago, the product of a pressing need, an intellectual spark and the sweep of a young man’s fingers through the sand.
    The result adorns almost every product of contemporary life, including groceries, wayward luggage and, if you are a traditionalist, the newspaper you are holding.
    The man on the beach that day was a mechanical-engineer-in-training named N. Joseph Woodland. With that transformative stroke of his fingers − yielding a set of literal lines in the sand − Mr. Woodland, who died on Sunday at 91, conceived the modern bar
code.
    Mr. Woodland was a graduate student when he and a classmate, Bernard Silver, created a technology, based on a printed series of wide and narrow striations, that encoded consumer-product information for optical scanning.
    Their idea, developed in the late 1940s and patented 60 years ago this fall, turned out to be ahead of its time, and the two men together made only $15,000 from it, when they sold their patent to Philco. But the curious round symbol they devised would ultimately give rise to the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the staggeringly prevalent rectangular bar code (it graces tens of millions of different items) is officially known.
Imagem Associada da Questão
    Here is part of the story behind the invention:
    To represent information visually, he realized, he would need a code. The only code he knew was the one he had learned in the Boy Scouts.
    What would happen, Mr. Woodland wondered one day, if Morse code, with its elegant simplicity and limitless combinatorial potential, were adapted graphically? He began trailing his fingers idly through the sand.
    “What I’m going to tell you sounds like a fairy tale,” Mr. Woodland told Smithsonian magazine in 1999. “I poked my four fingers into the sand and for whatever reason − I didn’t know − I pulled my hand toward me and drew four lines. I said: ‘Golly! Now I have four lines, and they could be wide lines and narrow lines instead of dots and dashes.’ ”
    That consequential pass was merely the beginning. “Only seconds later,” Mr. Woodland continued, “I took my four fingers − they were still in the sand − and I swept them around into a full circle.”
    Mr. Woodland favored the circular pattern for its omnidirectionality: a checkout clerk, he reasoned, could scan a product without regard for its orientation.
    But that method − a variegated bull’s-eye of wide and narrow bands −, which depended on an immense scanner equipped with a 500-watt light, was expensive and unwieldy, and it languished for years.
    The two men eventually sold their patent to Philco for $15,000 − all they ever made from their invention.
    By the time the patent expired at the end of the 1960s, Mr. Woodland was on the staff of I.B.M., where he worked from 1951 until his retirement in 1987.
    Over time, laser scanning technology and the advent of the microprocessor made the bar code viable. In the early 1970s, an I.B.M. colleague, George J. Laurer, designed the familiar black-and-white rectangle, based on the Woodland-Silver model and drawing on Mr. Woodland’s considerable input.
(Adapted from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/business/n-joseph-woodland-inventor-of-the-bar-code-dies-at-91.html?nl=todaysheadlines
&emc=edit_th_20121214&_r=0)
O pronome “It”, no início do texto, refere-se a
A
bar code.
B
young man.
C
beach.
D
sand.
E
luggage.
Considere a página a seguir que utiliza HTML versão 5 e CSS versão 3.
Imagem da Questão
A instrução CSS no interior da tag <style>
A
está incorreta, pois não pode ter dois pontos dentro do parêntese, antecedendo o valor last-child.
B
oculta a última coluna da tabela  e coloca cor de fundo vermelha nas duas primeiras colunas.
C
coloca a cor de fundo verde na última linha da tabela, que contém os valores Célula 3.1, Célula 3.2 e Célula 3.3.
D
está incorreta, pois a tag <td> não suporta o valor not(:last-child).
E
coloca cor de fundo verde em todas as colunas da tabela, exceto na última, que contém os valores Célula 1.3, Célula 2.3 e Célula 3.3. 
O JBoss Seam é um framework para desenvolvimento de aplicações Java EE que integra diversas tecnologias, principalmente da plataforma Java EE. Foi desenvolvido para eliminar a complexidade em níveis de arquitetura e API. A figura a seguir mostra a Integração do framework JBoss Seam em uma arquitetura Java EE. 
Imagem da Questão
As lacunas I, II, III e IV são preenchidas, correta e, respectivamente, por
A
HTML, AJAX, JBoss Seam e EJB.
B
HTML, Servlet, Seam e JDBC.
C
AJAX, Servlet, EJB 3 e Seam.
D
Facelets, JSF, Seam e EJB 3.
E
JSTL, Seam, JSF e JDBC. 
Considere clientes um objeto List que contém um conjunto de registros retornados de uma tabela do banco de dados por meio da execução de uma query SQL em uma aplicação web desenvolvida com Java utilizando o Hibernate. Considere também a existência de uma classe de entidade chamada Cliente que faz o mapeamento objeto-relacional com a tabela cliente do banco de dados. Nessas condições, considere os fragmentos de código abaixo:
Imagem da Questão
É correto afirmar que:
A
O Exemplo 2 está incorreto, pois não existe o método get na interface List, apenas na interface Set. O Exemplo 3 também está incorreto, pois a instrução for precisa de três parâmetros (início, limite e incremento/decremento) e, no exemplo, só recebe um.
B
O Exemplo 2 está incorreto, pois o método next da classe Iterator necessita de um parâmetro inteiro, indicando qual será o incremento ou salto na lista. Por exemplo, se for passado o parâmetro 1, o apontador de operações da lista salta uma posição a frente. 
C
Apesar do Exemplo 3 não acusar erro de compilação, o cast do objeto_cliente do tipo Object para o objeto cli do tipo Cliente não é necessário, pois a conversão de tipos, nesse caso, é automática. Além disso, este laço repete o mesmo elemento da lista infinitamente, pois não tem um incremento.
D
O Exemplo 2 está incorreto, pois o método iterator precisa receber como parâmetro o tamanho da lista. Como esse valor não foi passado como parâmetro, haverá um erro na compilação.
E
os três exemplos, quando executados em condições adequadas, terão o mesmo resultado, percorrendo a lista até o final. A cada passagem pelo interior do laço, um elemento da lista é colocado em um objeto da classe Cliente e, em seguida, o nome do cliente é exibido.
O CMMI fornece diretrizes baseadas em práticas para melhoria dos processos e habilidades organizacionais, cobrindo o ciclo de vida de produtos e serviços completos. Suas abordagens envolvem a avaliação da maturidade da organização, baseada em 5 níveis de maturidade. Para atingir cada nível, um conjunto de áreas de processo precisa ser desenvolvido.

Para uma empresa atingir o nível de maturidade 2 (Gerenciado) é preciso desenvolver áreas de alguns processos, dentre eles,
A
Gestão do Desempenho Organizacional e Análise e Resolução de Causas.
B
Desenvolvimento de Requisitos e Gestão de Riscos. 
C
Desempenho do Processo Organizacional e Gestão Quantitativa do Projeto. 
D
Definição do Processo Organizacional e Foco no Processo Organizacional. 
E
Gestão de Requisitos e Gestão da Configuração.
Os modelos de processos tradicionais surgiram em um cenário muito diferente do atual, baseado em mainframes e terminais remotos. Já os modelos de processos ágeis são adequados para situações atuais nas quais a mudança de requisitos é frequente. Dentre os modelos de processos ágeis mais comuns temos: Extreme Programming (XP), Scrum e Feature Driven Development (FDD).

Algumas das práticas e características desses modelos de processo são descritas a seguir:

I. Programação em pares, ou seja, a implementação do código é feita em dupla.
II. Desenvolvimento dividido em ciclos iterativos de até 30 dias chamados de sprints.
III. Faz uso do teste de unidades como sua tática de testes primária.
IV. A atividade de levantamento de requisitos conduz à criação de um conjunto de histórias de usuários.
V. O ciclo de vida é baseado em três fases: pre-game phase, game-phase, post-game phase.
VI. Tem como único artefato de projeto os cartões CRC.
VII. Realiza reuniões diárias de acompanhamento de aproximadamente 15 minutos.
VIII. Define seis marcos durante o projeto e a implementação de uma funcionalidade: walkthroughs do projeto, projeto, inspeção do projeto, codificação, inspeção de código e progressão para construção.
IX. Os requisitos são descritos em um documento chamado backlog e são ordenados por prioridade.

A relação correta entre o modelo de processo ágil e a prática/característica é:
A
Imagem da Opção A
B
Imagem da Opção B
C
Imagem da Opção C
D
Imagem da Opção D
E
Imagem da Opção E
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